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    KentPDG
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KentPDG
- user joined since December 1, 2006
23 questions asked by this user
2991 answers given by this user

Questions

What is NVQ?
In NVQ - asked by KentPDG - 2 answers - 9 years ago
For ex- or current military people only: What is the worst place the military has sent you?
In Military - asked by KentPDG - 3 answers - 9 years ago
For ex- or current military people only: Where is the most fascianting place the military has sent you?
In Military - asked by KentPDG - 2 answers - 9 years ago
Why are there no blue roses?
In Roses, flowers - asked by KentPDG - 2 answers - 9 years ago
Can you give a simple statement of the benefits of Commonwealth status?
In British Commonwealth - asked by KentPDG - 1 answer - 9 years ago

Answers

Neither.

There are two sodium ions in the first, on the left, and two chlorine. Also two hydrogen. So the first equation has to show 2HCl on the right, to be balanced. But that still doesn't work, because there would have to be two sodium sulfates on the right. Overall, just doesn't balance.

In the second equation, you would need 2S to join the 2Na, making 2NaS.


Go To Question - asked by KentPDG - 0 replies - 9 years ago

I have read that one man out of six is raising a child that is not his biological offspring, a fact of which he is unaware.

Not sure how one could collect or prove such a statistic, and it's probably exaggerated. Nevertheless, it is undeniably true that some men are raising children fathered, unbeknownst to them, by some other man. (One visualizes the cliche of the black-haired, olive-skinned youngster in a family of blond, blue-eyed nordics.)

I cannot imagine a law crueler than one obliging the mother to reveal to that child who was his or her biological father. Some facts are better left hidden.

You do not need to know your parents, for you to have an identity. Creating a sense of self is up to the individual, not something that is endowed by knowing the history of one's forebearers. There are very few diseases or disorders that could be prevented by knowing one's parents; and genetic testing will reveal virtually all genetic conditions that would militate against bearing children with a partner having the same condition. Regular medical checkups will show such things as early-stage cancers; one does not need to know (s)he comes from a cancer-prone family to have such checkups.

In most cases, the motivation to find one's biological parent(s) is not love, but blame. It is exceedingly unfair to people who have had to give up a child (or more), that they should later be confronted by someone who insists -- overtly or implicitly -- "how could you?".

So, although there may be a few circumstances in which access to information about one's birth parents could provide a benefit, I think that is vastly outweighed by the potential to do great emotional harm to most such parents, who wish to remain anonymous.


Go To Question - asked by KentPDG - 0 replies - 9 years ago

The optimum time for posting a question is when it occurs to you. Good questions will draw lots of answers, no matter when they are posted.

That said, the majority of our members are in the British Isles and western continental Europe. While they are on at various times throughout the day and evening, I get the impression that the greatest concentration is during the early evening hours, after dinner time. That seems to be the period when people hover over their computers, some of them trying to answer questions virtually the instant they are posted.

This is also the time when, it seems, people enter into the sometimes long sequences of comments, turning this site into a virtual chat room.


Go To Question - asked by KentPDG - 0 replies - 9 years ago

Not necessarily my favorite, but one that I have always thought very insightful:

"The union of theorist, organizer, and leader in one man is the rarest phenomenon in history; therein lies greatness."

Think about that. How many leaders can you name who were also great theorists, and who could organize people?

Chairman Mao might be one. Or maybe not. Karl Marx may have been a great theorist, but he couldn't organize an oompah band, never mind lead a group or a nation. Alexander Hamilton certainly qualifies as a great theorist, but he didn't get very far in organizing or leading.

So whom do you think said this ... about himself, obviously ... and who actually did organize large groups, and eventually lead a nation, guided by his own theories?

Take a moment to think about it.

Another moment.

OK, here's the source of the quote:

Adolf Hitler.


Go To Question - asked by KentPDG - 0 replies - 9 years ago

I guess that also meant the end of the ancient verse:

"Oranges and lemons
"Say the bells of St. Clemon's

"You owe me three farthings
"Say the bells of St. Martin's

"When will you pay me?
"Say the bells of Old Bailey."

Where did I learn that? George Orwell's 1984? I have known that little ditty for years, but alas will never again be able to use it.


Go To Question - asked by KentPDG - 0 replies - 9 years ago