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How many pores does the average body's skin have

asked in skin, health



KentPDG answers:

What do you consider an average person? Male or female? Age? Height and weight? Condition of health? And many other characteristics that may affect the density and number of pores.

Thre are thousands, perhaps tens of thousands of pores in the skin of most people. Ordinarily, they are invisible to the naked eye, but they can become infected or impacted by oils and other materials. Then they can become enlarged, and quite visible; and they will not necessarily shrink, but remain enlarged as a type of scar.

Skin care products, many of them focused on care of pores, are among the largest categories of cosmetic products. The simple fact is that ordinary soap and water are sufficient for the vast majority of people to care adequately for their skin.

More than anything else, the number of pores is related to one's total skin area. Hence, expect men to have more than women; and fat people to have more than skinny people. Loss of pores is related to aging, and to exposure to sun and certain chemicals. There is some degree of racial association and pore density, with Asians having slightly less than caucasians, who have slightly less than sub-Saharan Africans. However, those differences can be overwhelmed by the other factors such as size, age, and health.

But why, may I ask, would one even be interested in having such a number? It is just as easy to say seven thousand pores as eleven thousand pores. Who is going to contradict the number, and who is going to say Gee Whiz when hearing it? If you are trying to write advertising copy, with a claim like "Take special care of your 11,000 pores", allow me to suggest that it would not be a motivating or convincing message in any case.


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warriorprincessxena1 answers:

There are trillions of pores on the skin of the average human being but an exact figure is impossible because everybody is of a different mass and because there are just too many!!!
Skin pores are the openings of hair follicles, oil glands, and sweat glands. Because they are inherited, you cannot change their size, no matter what the cosmetic firms tell you.

It is true that certain conditions may make pores “appear” larger or smaller. Oily skin and severe acne, for example, may widen the oil ducts to create the “large pore” appearance. And pores may be more apparent on the nose, cheeks, and chin where there is the greatest concentration of oil glands. Repeated squeezing of blackheads and pimples may also lead to permanently widened pores, some of which may actually be tiny, pitted scars.

Other conditions can make your pores look smaller temporarily. For instance, note what happens to your pores when you acquire a sunburn. They become considerably smaller due to the inflammation and swelling around the pores. Once the inflammation has subsided, the pores will return to their original appearance. Pinching or gently slapping the skin of the cheeks to make them pink has a similar, temporary pore-shrinking effect.

There is no scientific evidence to support the fact that pores can be made to open and close, as many advertisements would lead you to believe. Certain astringents containing acetone and alcohol, as well as various facial masks, however, can produce a temporary “shrinking” effect. These products help remove excess oil from the skin surface that makes the skin feel cool and tight. A possible explanation of this phenomenon is that the astringent or mask acts as an irritant on the skin surface. This irritation causes swelling around the pore, thus making the opening appear smaller and shrunken. Any shrinkage, however, is so insignificant and so short-lived that the time, effort, and cost involved are usually not worth the outcome.

Similarly, hot baths, hot showers, and hot packs followed by cold baths, cold showers, and cold packs do absolutely nothing to the size of the pores. The only effect this “hot-cold” theory has is to make one feel that something – a tightening, a contraction, a shriveling, whatever – is actually going on in the pores. If, however, it makes you feel good – do it! It cannot do any harm.
for more info try this:
http://www.globusz.com/ebooks/Skin/00000056.htm


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