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What is the procedure for applying for permission to fly a jolly roger (just a little one)?
I rang the council this morning and they didnt have a clue but I know this has been a problem in some areas and dont want to fall foul of planning or other legislation. (Its wanted for my sons playhouse/pirate ship.
asked in planning, bylaws



siasl74 answers:

If you want to stick a *permanent* flagpole up, you will require planning permission.

I seem to vaguely recall that there may be different rules for vertical flagpoles as opposed to the ones that stick out from a house at an angle, but that may just be age messing with my memory.


Supplement from 06/25/2008 04:22pm:

If your local planning authority can't tell you if you need planning permission or not, then chances are you don't!


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funrunna answers:

I shouldn't thimk under the scenario You outline, that you'd actually need permission.

Now a fully fleged flag-pole atop o' yo' wigwam... Might be a different kettle of fish.


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Family.Guy answers:

Isn't life ridiculous that kids cant play Pirates without having to get planning permission for a jolly roger !!

Personally of its as small as i would of imagined then i would just put it up without applying for anything.

But if it had to be bolted to the floor and a permanent fixture then i guess you would have to apply as siasl said.

I would also ask the neighbours if they would object at least that way the council cant use that against you and they are less likely to recieve complaints thus they may never know about it. ;)


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wumpus answers:

Just do it.

If the council receives any complaints then take it down.
But I don't think it will pose any more problem than the playhouse itself.

It would take a pretty miserable person to complain about such a thing in the first place.


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blacksmith81 answers:

Provided the proposed flagpole falls within the criteria, set out below, you don't need planning permission;

Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development)
Order 2005
Erection of a flagpole within the curtilage of a dwelling.
The above Order allows that you may, without planning permission, erect a flagpole within the curtilage of a dwelling, provided that the house is neither Registered building or within a Conservation Area, where on completion of the operations:
(a) there would be no more than one flagpole within the curtilage;
(b) the height of the flagpole would not exceed 5m above ground level; and
(c) no part of the flagpole would be within 9m of the bank of any river designated as a Main River under the Land Drainage Acts.

http://www.gov.im/lib/docs/dlge/planning/publications/erectionofflagpoles.pdf


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Aiming4777 answers:

The Town and Country Planning (Permitted Development) Order 2005, allows that you may, without planning permission, erect a flagpole within the curtilage of a dwelling, provided that the house is neither Registered building or within a Conservation Area, where on completion of the operations there would be no more than one flagpole within the cartilage, the height of the flagpole would not exceed 5m above ground level and no part of the flagpole would be within 9m of the bank of any river designated as a Main River under the Land Drainage Acts. It is clear that what you propose does comply with all the requirements set out so no planning is needed for your flagpole.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/si2005/20050085.htm

The flag itself comes within the definition of "advertisement" under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990. The display of a flag is controlled by the Town and Country Planning (Control of Advertisements) Regulations 1992. However, under Schedule 2 of the Regulations, the national flag of any country, and this includes the Union flag, is exempt from advertisement control provided each flag is flown from a single vertical flagpole and neither the flag nor the flagpole display any advertisement additional to the design of the flag.


However, from your description, you have neither a flag nor a flag pole, you have a pennant. No permission is needed for this.

In any case, I agree with wumpus. The Local Authority don’t have gangs of people trawling the neighbourhoods looking for children’s play flags that might contravene planning regulations. Just let your son enjoy his play ship. If some miserable so-and-so does complain, the worst that can happen is that you have to take it down.


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sheps101 answers:

Ah think I sussed it....

Jolly Roger gesture is put to the sword

"SHE wanted to fly the Jolly Roger in her garden for a bit of fun - but Carol Clark's plan to run the flag up the pole has been shot down in flames.

Mrs Clark, 47, from The Rookery, Whitchurch, received a letter from the borough council after someone complained about the flag being flown.

An inspection by a council official followed - and Mrs Clark was then told flying the pirates' emblem contravened advertising regulations and that she would have to apply for consent, at a cost of £265, or risk legal action.

Mrs Clark, who works for Winterthur Life, said: "This is the daftest thing I've ever heard of. I thought someone was playing a joke when the letter arrived."

http://www.thisishampshire.net/display.var.1975842.0.jolly_roger_gesture_is_put_...

So it appears it is about advertising and you would have to apply for consent and at some great cost by the look of it. It doesn't seam right to be honest but possibly it only relates to flag pole not from kids playhouse/pirate ship.

I would contact the council explaining what you have found out re advertising and clarify if you do or don't need a licence. I would guess they will say you don't and get them to confirm that in writing.


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