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was the term terrorist in use in Sarajova in 1914?
when was the term first used?
asked in history ww1



Topaz2308 answers:

Haven't got definitive proof it was used at that time but it was a term that was used for many centuries for conflict between warring factions.

It was first used to describe one group who dominated another, and then vice versa.
The etymology of “terrorist” reveals at once the pliability of the term’s usage, even
during the period of the French revolution. According to The Oxford Dictionary of Word Histories, the Latin verb terrer, which means to frighten has “given rise to several English words. Terror is from Old French terrour, from Latin terror, a base shared by terrorist dating from the late 18th century from French terroriste. The word was
originally applied to supporters of the Jacobins in the French Revolution, who advocated repression and violence in pursuit of democracy and equality” (508). For even as power changed hands, “under a reconstituted Committee of Public Safety (1794) and by the
White Terror,” it was reported that “many former terrorists were executed” (World Encyclopedia). This pattern of terrorism breeding more terrorism recurs throughout history. It seems significant that the term was first used to describe a revolution born from the masses-- as if the term terrorist is emblazoned with special significance within the Euro-centric socio-cultural memory. Are there collective memories that make the dominant class shudder every time the word terrorist is dropped--its signification and meaning tied to images of the bloodthirsty masses pushing the aristocracy towards the
guillotines? Perhaps this nascent image undercuts all other images of terror, from 9/11 to lynching, from the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building to the Haymarket rebellion, from the holocaust to the Kent State massacre.

http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:0HThQR7UFN0J:forum.llc.ed.ac.uk/issue2/fabi...


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